The business community has the obligation, opportunity and capacity to increase the college and workforce readiness of all students through an ambitious, comprehensive agenda. BEST NC’s focus is clear: to improve the quality of education for North Carolina’s students and ensure the well-educated workforce that our businesses and economy require.

The Economic Imperative

North Carolina’s future economy, business environment and quality of life depend on how well we equip today’s students with the knowledge, skills and behaviors they need to succeed in school, work and life.

The Legal Imperative

The General Assembly shall provide by taxation and otherwise for a general and uniform system of free public schools… wherein equal opportunities shall be provided for all students. – Article IX, Section 2(1), North Carolina Constitution

The General Assembly shall provide that the benefits of The University of North Carolina and other public institutions of higher education, as far as practicable, be extended to the people of the State free of expense. – Article IX, Section 9, North Carolina Constitution

The Moral Imperative

Every child in North Carolina deserves and is owed the opportunity to obtain an excellent education, regardless of his or her race, family income, or zip code.

As business leaders, we believe the ultimate goal of education should be to create an educated and skilled citizenry that can be employed in North Carolina. Unfortunately, that goal is not being realized in North Carolina’s current education system and the state is experiencing a growing skills gap.

0
%
N.C. 2013 Graduating Class took the ACT
Only
0
%
NC High School Graduates met the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks
0
%
N.C. Students did not Meet Any ACT Benchmarks

In 2020, 68% of jobs in North Carolina will require some postsecondary education.

In 2013, only 58% of adults in North Carolina had some postsecondary education.

In 2013, only 34% of adults age 25 and older had an associates degree or higher.

As business leaders, we understand how critical talent management is in the success of any organization. Currently, North Carolina lacks a talent plan that will successfully recruit and retain excellent educators from pre-k through post-graduate.

0
hours
N.C. Teachers Work an Average Week

13,616 teachers out of the 95,028 teachers employed during the 2012-2013 school year left their LEA, resulting in an overall state turnover rate of 14.33%. This represents a significant increase in the turnover rate reported for the 2011-2012 school year at 12.13%.

As business leaders, we want North Carolina schools to be the best in the country. We need to focus on the types of transformations in education that will take the state from good to great.

As business leaders, we know that teachers can be most effective when students are ready to learn. Too many students in North Carolina are entering classrooms every day without the skills and resources they need to be successful.

0
Children
NC are ``at risk`` and meet NC PreK eligibility
0
Children
Served in NC PreK in 2013-2014
GAP:
0
Children
Who are Eligible and Not being Served